Case Western Reserve University: Culture

Commodities to culture.
Designers don’t follow trends. They set them.
There was a time when we started our days with a cup of Joe that cost pennies and was invariably black and acrid. Then one day designers started asking questions. Can coffee change culture? Hoe does the cup affect the sipping experience? What options can we offer? The answers transformed coffee from a 25¢ commodity to a $4 badge of distinction. Now designers are asking questions to transform another product that has become rife with sameness: the MBA.
The Weatherhead School of Management at Case Western Reserve University is spearheading the Managing as Designing concept – the integration of design attitude and skills into its MBA culture and curriculum.
As a designer, you respond to challenges holistically; by sketching alternatives, prototyping ideas and refining the best ideas. The Weatherhead MBA program speaks your language and can help you develop critical skills to complement your creative nature and shape the life of organizations and all they create.
discover Managing as Designing at design.case.edu

Advertising Agency: polkadotpeeps, Akron, USA
Creative Director / Copywriter: David Sutula
Art Directors: Lenny Vella
Illustrator: Lenny Vella
Photographer: Phong Nguyen
Published: November 2008

12 comments

JPhilly's picture
JPhilly
173 pencils

I think it works. As a student who is considering going for an MBA, it sets Case apart from your standard program, but the copy doesn't give too much away. I think it peaks the readers interest pretty well. However, I don't really like the tag "Manage by Designing". It feels a bit clunky to me. Maybe I would have went with "Management by Design" or something of that nature.
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http://jakephillips.wordpress.com

Guest's picture
Guest

I like the reference to coffee in the word 'commodities' with a cup as seen from above (the way ALL coffee looks from above) and then the hook with the reference to coffee in the word 'culture' as an obviously starbuck-clone cup (the differentiator between coffees being the package). Very clever copy and treatment. BTW: JPhilly, I think that the tag, Manage by Designing is the name of the program extant at the school.

Guest's picture
Guest

NADIE VA LEER ESTO... MUY LARGO.. NI EN PEDO.

Guest's picture
Guest

Well executed. Nice use of negative space and, as someone already says, it piques interest without giving too much away. Also, I like that there is no contact information other than the web address. Very different for a school, especially a business school.

Guest's picture
Guest

Are the coffee cups illustrations or photographs (or composites?)

dsutula's picture
dsutula
29 pencils

I am speaking for Lenny Vella, the cat who did the typography for this ad and the associated art - and truth be told he actually ended up writing the headline, too.

Both coffee graphic elements are different views of the same cup. The subject was a cup from a major Seattle-based retail coffee company. First, Lenny turned the insulated sleeve inside-out. He then shot a bunch of angles then took them into photoshop and illustrator to do some pretty heavy illustrative modification. So I guess the answer is that it is a composite...

Guest's picture
Guest

Designers don’t follow trends. They sell them.

dsutula's picture
dsutula
29 pencils

Not bad. I likey.

Guest's picture
Guest

saw this ad in Comm Arts - I think it's different than I woudl expect t see inthat pub

Guest's picture
Guest

Hoe does the cup affect the sipping experience?

is it hoe or how???

Guest's picture
Guest

Hoe does the cup affect the sipping experience?

is it hoe or how???

Guest's picture
Guest

Not legible.

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