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AT&T: Lost Dog No Offer

Advertising Agency: BBDO, NY, USA
Creative Group Head: Susan Credle
Producer: Bob Emerson
Copywriter: Darren Wright
BBDO Music Producer: Melissa Chester
Production Company: Smuggler, NY/LA/London
Director: Bennett Miller
Editorial Company: Beast, NY
Editor: Jim Ulbrich
VFX Company: Mass Market
Audio Post Company: Sonic Union, NY, NY
Mixer: Michael Marinelli
Music House: Big Foote, NY

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15 comments

alexander_bickov's picture
alexander_bickov
3279 pencils

Nice and positive idea

sirvan's picture
sirvan
29870 pencils

Yeah, no.

+++

"I love some things, and don't love some other things."

Guest's picture
Guest

This sucks. Why always the poor helpless black kid? And the overly (magnanimous) generous white savior?

Wouldn't it be better to show the smart and capable kid ask for her parents' phone and make all those things happen herself? You could demonstrate the usability of the product, reliability of the network and the smarts behind the technology, ease of use etc. Wouldn't it be super cute to see the look on her face when the her 'plan' comes together and she locates her puppy?

Guest's picture
Guest

God, I think that every time I watch this commercial.

sirvan's picture
sirvan
29870 pencils

Totally agree. This is painful beyond comprehension. It's so overly politically correct that it ends up being racially insensitive. And, as you said, there are many better, and more accurate ways of telling this same story. What a hack job. Wow.

+++

"I love some things, and don't love some other things."

Guest's picture
Guest

Sirvan,
So sorry to read you felt this was overly PC. I wrote and cast the ad. We cast the young girl because she beat out 100 little girls who didn't feel authentic about losing a dog. She got the part because she was the best actor. Not because the ad was written for skin color. Fortunately living in NYC for 20 years I don't see color of skin any more than I see color of hair or eyes...I just see people. I am so sorry that your read something into this beyond the best actors getting parts in an ad. Call the commercial too sweet, I'm cool. But it racially insensitive, you are being way too sensitive.

silvi's picture
silvi
4172 pencils

I don´t like the final expression of the boy.

PERP's picture
PERP
433 pencils

Simple. Good one.

.: look for the green giant on the label :.

navs's picture
navs
171 pencils

all ready made by Movistar

Guest's picture
Guest

movistar? where ? surely they copy this ad!!!!!!!!!!

Rou's picture
Rou
12 pencils

This really got to me!

Ah````My English is poor````

Guest's picture
Guest

I agree with some of your suggestions, "Guest," however, I think what was lost on some of you is the fact that this "boy" at the end is Tyler Hansbrough, sort of a celebrity to those of us who watch American college basketball (and a soon-to-be celeb if any of you follow the NBA). The spot was shot on the campuses of The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke, 2 HUGE rival schools, the former of which won the National Championship game last year led by Hansbrough. The message, then, was that these two big rival schools came together -- with the help of the AT&T network -- to help this girl find her dog. Finally, Hansbrough, who has been my hero for the last 4 years (I just graduated from UNC-Chapel Hill), and the AT&T network emerge as the heroes in the end.

It's not big, white man helps poor, helpless black child AT ALL.

In my opinion, ad well done!

Guest's picture
Guest

Not a good enough use of Hansbrough. Unless you really know college basketball (I will assume that a lot of ATT&T prospects don't), then having him in the spot is not a big enough payoff as it could be. He needs to be established more (even with NCAA or license limitations). The wireless category itself is weak.

Guest's picture
Guest

I wrote the spot. The child in the lead was cast because she was the best actor. It wasn't written for skin color. When she auditioned, she simply had a beautiful face that in the world of 30 second story telling was immediate. Tyler was a bit of creative conceit; I graduated from UNC and thought it would add an extra layer of interest to the ad for those who "got it" and yet for those who didn't, the story still worked.

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