Purina: Tail

It's not the size of your tail, it's how you wag it.
Incredibites
Bring out the incredible in your small dog.

Advertising Agency: Lowe Roche, Canada
Associate Creative Director / Art Director: Sean Ohlenkamp
Copywriter: Simon Craig
AB: Beth MacKinnon
Photographer: Hugh Kretschmer
Artist Rep: Sharpe + Associates
Published: August 2010

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9 comments

atb2005's picture
atb2005
13567 pencils

Cute art, but I am not keen on the copy. Who cares about the size of their dog's tail? And, what's so special about the way a dog wags its tail? Finally, Purina would bring out the incredible in your "small" dog by making it wag its tail faster or what?

vanMeter's picture
vanMeter
80 pencils

its cute, your right. Not sure how this will sell more dog food, thats the idea with ads if I recall.

Guest's picture
Guest

Well i think its a pun on the oldest line "its not the size of ur pen**, its how u use it". so its a nasty pun on a dogs tail. this shows thats its not so effective as the creative artwork. Coz i loved the artwork.

angieraj's picture
angieraj
428 pencils

Seems like they want to try and sell it to the end customer.... your pet. How strange.

Cognito Ergo Sum

atb2005's picture
atb2005
13567 pencils

I was gonna say that too. It's odd indeed.

Guest's picture
Guest

Amazing art direction. Very poor copy.

Guest's picture
Guest

it meens... it's not important if your "tool" is big or small... the important thing is how do you use it... it's not so difficult I think...

Guest's picture
Guest

the slogan originate from the proverb "it's not the size of your boat, it's the motion of the ocean." which is visually represented in this ad. but the meaning of the proverb is so mis-understood that this ad become awakward.

Guest's picture
Guest

It's a simple concept, no need to over-think it or take it too literally--Purina brings out the best in small dogs, so that they're size doesn't matter. I'm not sure why someone would think that this copy is supposed to be taken literally--it's not selling to the dog, but to the person who wants their small dog to be able to do big things. It's selling an idea not a literal ability, or anything relating to the dog's tail...Nor is it an innuendo, meant to be nasty or sexually suggestive haha--this idiom has been used in LOTS of other ways relation to size outside the world of genitalia. I'm guessing some of this is getting lost in translation for non-American viewers.

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