Propaganda & Marketing Newspaper: Sherlock Holmes

Sherlock Holmes never said “Elementary, my dear Watson."
When the advertising is good, it becomes a part of history

Advertising Agency: age. comunicações, São Paulo, Brazil
Creative Director: Carlos Domingos
Art Director: Henrique Mattos
Copywriter: Daguito Rodrigues
Illustrator: Techno Image
Published: August 2009

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16 comments

silvi's picture
silvi
4172 pencils

I like the phrase: "When the advertising is good, it becomes a part of history"

tirthomitro's picture
tirthomitro
2722 pencils

a really great & memorable cmpgn.
Congratulations to the crtv. team.

they showed me a picture & i laughed
dignity has never been photographed

Guest's picture
Guest

well if you going to say that fact about Sherlock Holmes you might as well get it all right....He never wore one of those hats in the book either.

everartz's picture
everartz
7611 pencils

very nice thought and art..

| Everartz |

Guest's picture
Guest

Great copy, brilliant art work, smart concept. I mean, it's f***ing perfect campaign. Congratulations to the creative team.

Honest Dave's picture
Honest Dave
233 pencils

I know everyone loves these, but you're referring to a movie, not advertising. And the vikings refer to opera, not advertising, And what advertisement positioned the 100 year war as the 100 year war? I like the artwork and art direction, but this campaign makes no sense,

rolling.stone's picture
rolling.stone
2740 pencils

completely agree

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~ Quite obviously, I have gathered no moss ! ~

Guest's picture
Guest

Whoa you need to get your facts right first…
Sherlock Holmes is a character from a book that first appeared in 1887. But it was the TV series that introduced the phrase “Elementary, my dear Watson." Through the advertising people associated that phrase with Sherlock Holmes.
Vikings raided and colonized wide areas of Europe from the late eighth to the early eleventh century before they became characters in operas. Through illustrations (a type of ad) we learnt to stereotype Vikings with horn helmets.
And the “100 years War” was known as the 100 year war though word of mouth which, as I’m sure you know, is another form of advertising.

Honest Dave's picture
Honest Dave
233 pencils

OK, I got it now. Great. Hey, here's some more for the campaign.

-Alf isn't really from Melmac and he never actually ate a cat.

-The Fresh Prince was never an actual prince and DJ Jazzy Jeff's jazziness is questionable.

-Greenland isn't really green. It was the vikings with the horns on the helmets who named it to trick people.

A stranger abroad's picture
A stranger abroad
427 pencils

I agree. It is not advertising that created these perceptions.

Guest's picture
Guest

@Honest Dave and those who agree with him, try taking a look at 'advertising' in its most neutral sense: ie: making something known and then popular. In that light, the campaign works brilliantly - the aspect of the movie was POPULARIZED - ADVERTISED and become MEMORABLE and thus passed on from generation to generation, thus HISTORIC. Same for the opera etc reference. The link is now made to modern advertising. I think it makes PERFECT sense. Love the work.

Guest's picture
Guest

I agree. 'Advertising', here, is refered to its most neutral sense: "to make something known and popular".

Guest's picture
Guest

Taken from an HBO special done a couple years ago called "Assume the Position" with Robert Wuhl.

He states: "When legend becomes fact, print the legend." Same concept, different words.

A stranger abroad's picture
A stranger abroad
427 pencils

I believe that line comes from the classic Henry Fonda / John Wayne movie 'The man who shot Liberty Valance.' Great movie.

On the campaign. I agree the insight is good - I creating public opinion, perception is more important than reality.

But implying that advertising created these particular myths is going a bus stop or two too far. Just pointing out that perception creates its own reality and that advertising creates perception should've been enough. I see this is a good campaign let down on a detail.

I think It is not only ad people who will stumble on the disconnect between the excellent insight and the over-reaching claim.

btw, the 100 years was really a series of conflicts, not one continuous period of fighting. And nobody called it the 100 years war at the time. At least for the first 99 years.

Guest's picture
Guest

i don't love them. they look old, technique has been done before and idea is so so

Guest's picture
Guest

This is a great piece of work. I love them. Great idea and outstanding work of art. Congrats!

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