Polar Music Prize: Animals

Pink Floyd are back in town.

Advertising Agency: Storakers McCann, Stockholm, Sweden
Art Director: Henric Almquist
Copywriters: Hanna Belander, Bjorn Hjalmar
Photographer: Sven Prim
Published: August 2008

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19 comments

topawers's picture
topawers
139 pencils

Pink Floyd IS back in town. Learn to write suckers.

Copy_Can's picture
Copy_Can

lol - beat me to it.

teenie's picture
teenie
1894 pencils

Me too! Grammar 101.

Dozer's picture
Dozer
149 pencils

lol nice one dude, really make me laugh!
i are laughing right now! lol

Don Rapper's picture
Don Rapper
223 pencils

guess they ISN'T very good copys

Ad_Man's picture
Ad_Man
828 pencils

two copies, one big mistake. shame on you guys.

Think it for a while.
Then, in anytime, it will come to your mind as an idea.

Favete's picture
Favete
365 pencils

and i thought my english was bad...

MINAKA MORI's picture
MINAKA MORI
90 pencils

Rule number 3.- When yo're sure of the copy... check it again!

------------------------------------------------
Don't try to stand out of the crowd; avoid crowds altoghether.

blockzero's picture
blockzero
15 pencils

I guess they tried to refer to pink floyd as a group of people rather than an individual. It sounds weird with "are" though.

Psycho Pirate's picture
Psycho Pirate
65 pencils

As I understand it, in British English, any group even when mentioned as a collective gets referred to as plural. Hence, saying Pink Floyd ARE back in town is correct. Just as it would be correct to say "Manchester United are back" or "Arsenal are playing Manchester United" and "Panic At The Disco are on tour."

Most of us are more familiar with American english which would refer to a collective as singular.

vurtomatic's picture
vurtomatic
364 pencils

Nope.

ricklongo's picture
ricklongo
1244 pencils

He's absolutely right. just check the wikipedia entry for some British bands.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muse_(band)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oasis_(band)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Verve

Copy_Can's picture
Copy_Can

Really? Though not "British", these names do represent a collective group:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metalica
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garbage

ricklongo's picture
ricklongo
1244 pencils

And yet they say "Garbage is" and "Metallica is", while the links I posted say "Muse are", "Oasis are" and "The Verve are".

The fact of the matter is, Americans would say "Pink Floyd is", while Britons would most likely say "Pink Floyd are", and thus those crying "typo!" are wrong.

Copy_Can's picture
Copy_Can

I'm not American. In fact, Canadian English is pretty much the same as British English.

vurtomatic's picture
vurtomatic
364 pencils

I studied British English. But of course Wiki knows better.

simon.gross's picture
simon.gross
541 pencils

Both are correct in this case. You would say The Rolling Stones are back, or the Beatles are back, because the alternative is a bit weird. But you could say Motley Crue is back, or Motley Crue are back. It doesn't matter which one you use. Both work. Pink Floyd is the same. It's not as clear cut as some people seem to think.

vurtomatic's picture
vurtomatic
364 pencils

'The band is,' or 'the band are?' Same thing, 'Pink Floyd is.'

slip's picture
slip
919 pencils

It are an injustice ;)

*****

SJB

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