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20 comments

epoc.mak's picture
epoc.mak
90 pencils

The first and the last one are good

Rattan Makkar

SeanMartin's picture
SeanMartin

It'd be nice if there were a few more clues as to exactly what the heck is going on here. I gather it's an anti-drinking campaign, but then what?

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No, I am not a media buyer.

scarfinati's picture
scarfinati
830 pencils

you could so much more with that tagline.

Guest commenter's picture
Guest commenter

True, Colt might be associated with low-income employees who drink on the job. But that doesn't mean they would actually want to embrace it.

P Money's picture
P Money

Coming from a job background where I know and work with the target of this ad, there is pride in their position and a lot do enjoy the "Cult" they are a part of. Workers who like to get fucked up. I think it's fully acceptable when only a select target will drink your product. Much like the current Keystone campaign. We poke fun, but their audience knows it's true and most embrace the truth even though it's a harsh one. It's their own truth. Bad side, this isn't going to get anymore new customers outside of the target, obviously. I feel it's acceptable for such a shitty product, for once your not lying about the quality - your being true to the lifestyle.

sneakyhands's picture
sneakyhands
1857 pencils

i know you're just exploring your range, but the message is pretty irresponsible. so 'no' to these, but maybe try a strategy that doesn't insult your heavy users or promote alcoholism. it's good to make a client nervous, but totally disgusted means you went a step too far.

A.G. Pennypacker's picture
A.G. Pennypacker
607 pencils

I'm confused. The logo on these ads clearly say "Cult 45" and the tag reinforces that. But that is not the name of the beer and there is no reason to change it even on a spec ad. What am I missing here? What the hell are you trying to sell? Is this really for some clothing brand as suggested by another poster? I'd like to give you guys the benefit of the doubt and believe this is NOT your idea of "speaking" to the target. I'd like to believe that your apparent f**ked-up and racist vision of who "you think" Colt 45 drinkers are, has been totally misconstrued and this is NOT how you actually expect to sell beer to this client's customers. But without clarification, I have no other choice. (Which is a damn shame because these ads are actually quite beautiful). I know you guys are reading these comments so please—how about one of you man-up and explain what the hell is going on here and what you were thinking.

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"I have a screen name because not having one is for pussies."

LessTalkMoreMock's picture
LessTalkMoreMock
104 pencils

Nothing in these ads are racist.

That Guy's picture
That Guy

First of all, there is no reason for anyone to explain to you their motivation for doing anything. You don't get that luxury of having everything you don't understand spoon-fed to you by someone who is willing to open their mind to a world that is foreign to them. Just like any other ad, if you don't get it, it wasn't meant for you. So rather than go on and on about how terrible it is because YOU don't get it, just simply say I don't get it and move on. Or maybe don't say anything at all. If there's nothing constructive you can add to the dialogue, perhaps it may be best to not say anything at all. This is supposed to be a constructive exercise where things are built up, not torn down. So maybe the next time you feel the need to lash out, think twice about what you're going to say about the fruition of someone's or a group of people's time and effort. Rather than cursing them out and calling them racist, just ask politely what they were trying to do, rather than condemning what you don't understand and insulting those that created it. I'm sure you would appreciate the same treatment.

Second of all, these ads are not racist. If you automatically assume that people who work as janitors, construction workers, graffiti artists, and the other not-so glamorous professions are automatically minorities, perhaps you need to take a look at yourself before you go casting stones at others. There is nothing inherently racist about this work, only the racist interpretation one makes viewing them.

A.G. Pennypacker's picture
A.G. Pennypacker
607 pencils

LessTalkMoreMock,
You say nothing in these ads is racist? It's sad that you don't see it—but not surprising. Nevertheless that's your opinion. Feel free to have it. You're probably not a member of a group that would take offense to this advert. But speaking as someone who would fit into the category of minority, there is plenty in series that highlights negative stereotypes and SCREAMS insensitivity towards those who tend to fall on the lower end of the social economic ladder. That includes the product itself. But unfortunately this is what can happen when ad people who are not members of a particular race or culture, don't do their homework, and don't bother to learn what might be offensive to the target group. I'm willing to wager that no one who worked on this campaign is Black, Hispanic, Asian or other. If they are, they should be ashamed. I have a lot years under my belt speaking to this target and successfully selling them all manner of products. Trust me, they are much more sophisticated than you think and these ads would do nothing but piss them off. Any client who understands this target and wants to stay in business would fire this agency on the spot! Because clearly these creatives don't understand their customer. They think they do, but they don't. People are aspirational. All people—all colors. They do not want to be talked down to. And as I said earlier, these ads are perpetuating negative stereotypes of drinking on the job, engaging in reckless and dangerous behavior, vandalism and destroying others property. Now you tell me who the hell would welcome being told, "That's who you are, and that's how we see you"?

Just because these behaviors may or may not be true, doesn’t mean YOU as an advertiser get to say it. (sort of like the rules for the N-word). So this self-deprecating-embrace your bad behavior-skateboarder mentality approach, might work when speaking to the X-Games crowd—but not when you’re dealing with the touchy subject of selling a low level alcoholic beverage to poor people of color. They would never let you get away with speaking to them that way.

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"I have a screen name because not having one is for pussies."

LessTalkMoreMock's picture
LessTalkMoreMock
104 pencils

Everything in this comment is racist.

Guest commenter's picture
Guest commenter

First of all, there is no reason for anyone to explain to you their motivation for doing anything. You don't get that luxury of having everything you don't understand spoon-fed to you by someone who is willing to open their mind to a world that is foreign to them. Just like any other ad, if you don't get it, it wasn't meant for you. So rather than go on and on about how terrible it is because YOU don't get it, just simply say I don't get it and move on. Or maybe don't say anything at all. If there's nothing constructive you can add to the dialogue, perhaps it may be best to not say anything at all. This is supposed to be a constructive exercise where things are built up, not torn down. So maybe the next time you feel the need to lash out, think twice about what you're going to say about the fruition of someone's or a group of people's time and effort. Rather than cursing them out and calling them racist, just ask politely what they were trying to do, rather than condemning what you don't understand and insulting those that created it. I'm sure you would appreciate the same treatment.

Second of all, these ads are not racist. If you automatically assume that people who work as janitors, construction workers, graffiti artists, and the other not-so glamorous professions are automatically minorities, perhaps you need to take a look at yourself before you go casting stones at others. There is nothing inherently racist about this work, only the racist interpretation one makes viewing them.

Guest commenter's picture
Guest commenter

F*cked up? Racist?? I fail to see how you could misconstrue anything in this ad in such a way.

It's an add for BLOODY MALT LIQUOR. Get over it.

Guest commenter's picture
Guest commenter

"F**ked-up"?? Racist?? I fail to see how this could be misconstrued in any such way. It's an add for bleedin' MALT LIQUOR. Get over yourself.

riorio's picture
riorio

How can these ads be racist? There are no people. I think the explanation above is spot on. I think the people in these ads are part of the Colt 45 culture, and am glad for once someone did not neglect that.

Tina Dev's picture
Tina Dev
60 pencils

inat

Come on, this is spoken by the employer under the influence of the beer who saw the work is done but cannot make out whether it is clean or not.

Guest's picture
Guest

Forget racism. I'm offended by bad advertising.

Guest's picture
Guest

these ads suck so bad.

Guest's picture
Guest

These ads suck so bad? This might be true, but I fail to see why. You should tell everyone why. If you're a creative that can't justify your or defend your thoughts this comment is wasting everyone's time or rather the thought. Cheers.

Guest's picture
Guest

If this ad wasn't to be directed toward someone, what's the problem? The ad is obviously trying to sell to a particular type of person - end of story. Why should affect anyone else, who thinks he/she understands the ad?

Malt liquor is cheap, high alcohol beer. Its makers have exploited the lower classes since, at least, the 1980s. And, the liquor industry has honored the exploiters, while the exploited, to whom this ad is directed, have suffered the consequences - increasing rates of pancreatic and liver diseases, beside all sorts of other social problems.

While the current trend is to say it is the "individual's" fault that he drinks, the liquor industry, which includes malt liquor makers, spends more on marketing, advertising and promotion than just about any other industry. So, the implication is the liquor industry must really foolish for spending so much on propaganda, if it is just left up to the individual to make the decision to drink.

What would it be like if there were no liquor advertisements at all? Would the negative impact of alcohol be as great? Would we all adjust to a normal life without any liquor ads? And, is it really a matter of infringement of an individual's "freedom of speech" to disallow a corporation not to advertise? It was only after early 1900s that corporate entities began to equate themselves with individual human rights.

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