Unicef: Unicef Book Of Days

Advertising Agency: Saatchi & Saatchi, Johannesburg, South Africa
Creative Director: Bennie Du Plessis
Art Director: Keshia Meyerson
Copywriters: Ben Du Plessis, Jeff Harvey, Gabi Mostert, Eric Whitstock
Photographer: Simon Scholtz
Illustrator: Keshia Meyerson
Producer: Scot Aitken
Account Supervisor: Nicky Scheuble
Account Manager: Carla Stanbridge
Planner: Adene Van Der Walt
Other additional credits: Sagren Reddy
Released: 2009

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10 comments

Guest's picture
Guest

Why do Saatchi & Saatchi insist on being pretentious about everything!!!

Guest's picture
Guest

this is beyond pretense. this is sick.

corndogfuneral's picture
corndogfuneral
1053 pencils

I give it a 2 for trying to help. No more than that. I am a little unclear of what is actually going on. Texting to save lives? Have we really come to this?

Guest's picture
Guest

I agree. This is such bullshit. Who in their right minds spends this much money on some fancy "concept" when the money would have been better spent going to the charity itself. It's quite obvious that no cash-strapped charity can produce such a glossy fund-raiser. Could it have something to do with the looming Loerie Awards deadline maybe?

Chris's picture
Chris
1987 pencils

feed a kid, cut down a Forrest in the meanwhile.

Guest's picture
Guest

maybe this idea will score high in the world mental gymnastics championships.

Madibaman's picture
Madibaman
101 pencils

The heart's in the right place but I think this is simply a waste of resources and time. The book doesn't mean anything as there's no physical evidence that the donor's money is actually doing any good to anyone. Anyone can doodle or trace in the book (and there'll be bastards who'll do more to it, I'm sure). If I'm going to donate money for a good cause, the last thing I want to do is draw in a book on top of it because there's ultimately no benefit from doing so. One reason why people don't want to donate is because they don't know what they're money is going to used for - they don't see who gets to gain from it and how. Find a link between the money and the recipient and you'll have yourself a winner. In the meantime, a couple of trees just died for this fruitless exercise.

Guest's picture
Guest

Of course, you're all absolutely right. We should show starving/dying children maybe. Or nothing at all. We should collect food and fly off to Africa and hand-deliver it.

So many of us do that. And those little tins set up on counters are collecting more than enough!

I encountered one of these little books in a restaurant on a visit to South Africa recently and, thanks to its beautiful presentation and design my first thought wasn't "Fuck, here comes the guilt trip!"

Its look gave it credibility but believe me, although it's well made with is no leather-bound tome. Hardly as expensive to produce as some have made out.

The comments written in the book by the children are amazing. They're innocent cases for doing good put forward by (hopefully) these little buggers.

After I'd read some of them I decided to see who was asking for what/how much.

And that's where I think the idea lies. I didn't have to get up or fend off a drunk nagging beggar or wonder about how I could help before loosing interest completely.

I picked up my phone (nice, clean and comfortable) and sent a little text/sms off.

It's not earth-shattering. But it got me, cynical exponent of this business, to send off a text. Without making me hate myself. It made giving easy.

JJson's picture
JJson
2 pencils

Agreed. Effective little idea.

Guest's picture
Guest

TIENES RAZON CHRIS. DEBIERON UTILIZAR PAPEL RECICLADO PARA HACER EL LIBRO.

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