Prada: Marfa store

A surreal installation of real Prada store in the middle of the desert outside of the town Valentine in West Texas near Marfa, USA. From the artists:
"...the combination of a vast, open desert landscape in an un-populated area and a luxury goods store is completely unthinkable. Nature suits fashion as a visual backdrop, as one often sees in advertisement. the minimal, corporate prada design and the desolate surrounding ranch land make a great impression together, but simultaneously the two forces also render each other useless."

Credits: Michael Elmgreen & Ingar Dragset
Released: 2005

12 comments

pieter's picture
pieter
216 pencils

really cool. the particular location seems kind of pointless besides the whole texas/ghost-town tie in but cool nonetheless.

Wordnerd's picture
Wordnerd
6660 pencils

and what was the intention here besides burning money? looks like art, not ad

adrianapr's picture
adrianapr
1238 pencils

sorry, but...

"...the combination of a vast, open desert landscape in an un-populated area and a luxury goods store is completely unthinkable. Nature suits fashion as a visual backdrop, as one often sees in advertisement. the minimal, corporate prada design and the desolate surrounding ranch land make a great impression together, but simultaneously the two forces also render each other useless."

wtf???
who is the target here? middle of the desert?? outside the town?..
agree with wordnerd... maybe it's art, since the artists gave an explanation (or something like that)... what if we don't have this explanation, as for example... the customers??

come on.

ivan's picture
ivan

It's meant to generate hype in the press I believe.

Ivan Raszl, admin of AotW

Jet Propulsion Lab's picture
Jet Propulsion Lab
10681 pencils

And there'll be another Starbucks just down the road in no time...

A pretty conceptual but masturbatory piece of work on the artist's part.

Happy New Year to all!

512's picture
512
212 pencils

I like it when art becomes ad. but this is really pointless. nobody will talk about it, apart from us stupids...

thirty6chambers's picture
thirty6chambers
1464 pencils

speak for yourself.
http://digg.com/odd_stuff/The_World_s_Loneliest_Prada_Store_PICS
It was one of the most talked about article last week on digg.com

adrianapr's picture
adrianapr
1238 pencils

people talking about it doesn't mean necessarily a good thing...
read the digg.com comments, 99% are BAD, man!!!
so why is it important that it's in digg???

if it was positive hey, ok, but it's not the case here.

remember what ikea did when opening a new store? they put a living room outside the store, for people to STEAL it.. and people did!! and they didn't buy one single dollar in media, the cost was only the furniture cost. THAT idea generated a lot, but A LOT of buzz and publicity, in a good way. Now that's an idea!!

but i don't really see the point on this prada store, it's just stupid. my opinion, of course.

whitespace's picture
whitespace
1953 pencils

Looks ripe for the stealin'.

elmikel's picture
elmikel
1147 pencils

excellent! the brand gained a lot of buzz and that's worth the money...this was surely not expensive.

kusseejner's picture
kusseejner
242 pencils

In my opinion the difference between art and advertising is that the latter has a defined story to tell, namely that of the client. The challenge is to tell this story in a new, unexpected way. Art has no reference point outside the mind of the artist and this is what makes it rather pointless. I'm sure you can get some guy to stick five cans of Coke up his arse and get a story going and perhaps even call it an ironic commentary to the post-modern capitalist society that we live in. But it still wouldn't be advertising.

Guest's picture
Guest

I think this piece is very interesting and has infiltrated our media in more ways than you could expect! You can even buy advertising for this installation. The T.V. show Gossip Girl has a sign for Prada Marfa in Lily van der Woodsen's living room. You can purchase a duplicate of that sign from worksonwhatever.com

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