The letter the Campbell Soup Company sent Andy Warhol

The letter the Campbell Soup Company sent Andy Warhol concerning his famous paintings of their soup cans in 1964.

Following the success of Andy Warhol’s 32 Campbell’s Soup Cans, a product marketing manager at Campbell’s, William MacFarland, decided to express his admiration for the Pop artist’s work by sending him this fan letter, along with a couple of cases of tomato soup.

Can you imagine that happening today? There's simply no way. Instead, you'd get a legal nastygram cease & desist, with all sorts of claims about trademark and a likelihood of confusion and demands to hand over the paintings immediately. And then people would defend Campbell Soup, saying they "had to" defend their trademark. How quickly the world has changed.

Via: lettersofnote

10 comments

Guest's picture
Guest

How true!

Guest's picture
Guest

What I think is funny is that the owner from Campbell soup didnt have enoght money to buy a Warhol by then and instead sendhim a boy of tomato soup.

Guest's picture
Guest

The world's gone politically correct. But being politically correct is bullshit. Oh sorry, being politically correct is bull faeces.

Guest's picture
Guest

"The world" ? By that, you mean the US, right ? True enough, we (Europe) are being polluted by the USian legal practices but the situation is still a lot saner over here. As for the rest of the world, I do not know.

Guest's picture
Guest

Kinda sounds like he was fishing for a free painting, actually. Still, very cool.

Guest's picture
Guest

And yet the art was an indictment on mass production. Pretty funny.

Guest's picture
Guest

You might get a nastygram today - or you may not - brands are getting the idea. Like Hot Pockets sending a giant Hot Pocket mascot to Jim Gaffigan comedy shows. - at times they know when to capitalize.

Guest's picture
Guest

Has the law changed between 1964 and today in regards to using trademarks without permission? Maybe it has and companies seriously don't have a choice now but to send nastygrams to defend their trademark.

Guest's picture
Guest

Im not entirely sure about this. The more famous the artist the less a brand would care. I thing the real issue is that we don;t really have any famous artists today even close to the popularity or stature of Andy or artists of the past. The real problem is that todays society does not care about that

usualspot's picture
usualspot
154 pencils

Two cases of soup isn't much, but beats a threatening letter from a lawyer.

I wonder if Andy sent them a painting.

thought from the usualspot

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