Super Bowl and the social network

Facebook is going to be a Super Bowl marketer's best friend this year as the social network is set to edge out YouTube for ad searching and sharing, VB&P found in results from our third annual Super Bowl survey.

“Facebook has been critical to game day and post game marketing for a couple of years now, but for the first time in our study we are seeing the site bypass YouTube and brand sites as the first place Americans search online for ads pre-game,” said Lucy Farey-Jones, partner and head of strategy, VB&P.

Almost one in five (19%) Americans searched for ads before the game in 2011, about double (11%) who did in 2010. Of that group, 48% searched for ads on Facebook, putting the site just ahead of popular video sharing site YouTube, brand sites, and media sources as the lead destination to find ads. As Audi of America’s agency of record and creator of five years’ worth of Super Bowl spots, VB&P is taking advantage of this trend in this year’s game. To learn more, visit Audi’s Facebook page on January 25th.
Facebook will also be the place where Americans share ads. More than a third (36%) of Americans plan to share their favorite ad via social media. Of that group, 87% will share via Facebook, which is more than emailing with a YouTube link (6%) and Twitter (4%). Facebook will also be the place where Americans share ads. More than a third (36%) of Americans plan to share their favorite ad via social media. Of that group, 87% will share via Facebook, which is more than emailing with a YouTube link (6%) and Twitter (4%). Theoretically, this means that if 111 million people watched this year’s game, there could be 35 million posts on Facebook about Super Bowl advertising and with the average Facebook user having 130 friends, those collective posts could result in over 4.5 billion incremental impressions.

Overall, digital engagement during the Super Bowl has experienced double-digit increases from 2010—2012, proving Americans are increasingly multitasking during the big event. More than half (52%) plan to be engaged with some type of communications tool(s) while watching the game, a percentage that drastically increases for young adults (85%). 30% of Americans will be texting and roughly a quarter will be on Facebook, followed by e-mail, telephone, search, Twitter, IM and blogging.

Ads are more likely to be the subject of conversation the day after the game than the halftime show and party they attended, with 27% saying that’s what they’ll discuss at Monday’s water cooler. Also good news for brands who advertise --Americans are almost as likely to “like” a brand on Facebook that advertises during the Super Bowl (20%) as they are to “like” a team (29%), with 23% of young adults likely to “like” a brand.

In line with NBC’s decision to stream the Super Bowl live over the Internet to computers, phones and tablets, VB&P’s survey also found 40% of respondents use alternatives to cable as their primary source to watch television and movies. 18-29 year-olds are leading this digital movement with 1 out of 2 saying that cable is not their primary source. Compared to the 60+ segment, they are four times more likely to use Netflix, seven times more likely to use Hulu and 10 times more likely to use YouTube to watch shows and movies.

2 comments

Hadrons's picture
Hadrons
5743 pencils

Well the countdown for advertising night begun ...
I can't wait to see all those ads.
You should have a special tab for super bowl 46

Steve Watson's picture
Steve Watson
2 pencils

Will I'd have to agree with all the social networks around the word. Things are really being discovered very quick and soon. Cheats and spammers have no place to hide and this is the biggest advantage of the things that are yet to come.

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