The good ,the bad and the ugly...

Good: Your hubby and you agree, no more kids.....
Bad: You can't find your birth control pills .....
Ugly: Your daughter is using them .....

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A client,one fine morning, walked into the agency i was with and started shouting....

The owner of a small textile chain cum super market cum white goods chain group, illiterate and ignorant, sometimes imbecile... he was dreaded by the accounts and clients service team......

He put unreasonable demands which they felt ashamed to present before creatives back home, and worse he was one human being who celebrated his ignorance...

The guy was angry over the use of white space... a full page ad which the creatives had beautifully executed , with lot of white space and hence would definitely break the clutter...

I pay for it.. he barked... and i will not spend my money for your experiments.

But sir.. explained one dare devil.... we had got it approved by your manager.

I have dismissed him... he roared...now you answer.

There are good clients, bad ones and ugly ones... the one who allows the agency to do its creative responsibilities in advertising ,independently(of course the clients consent is needed but....) are good ones, the one who keeps the dog and insist on barking himself is bad one and the one like the textile guy who would get nowhere closer to the fundamentals of advertising are the ugly ones.

Is there a choice for agencies?

Do they get to choose the good ones?

Consider bad ones and maybe take them,

Outrightly reject the ugly ones?

"I will not allow my staff to be bullied by tyrants, and I will not run a campaign dictated by a client unless I believe in its basic soundness.When you do that you imperil the creative reputation of your agency" Spake Ogilvy..

So brave... because he had the choice..

Today the client decides...

Sit with the client and see his product in his angle, his color.. again said Ogilvy

Excuse me sir... from your heavenly abode give me a small hint...

what happens when i am sitting with my textile chain client who is color blind?

1 comment

Joel Rojo's picture
Joel Rojo

I'm a 22 year old marketer building his own marketing strategy agency in northwest Mexico, so maybe you could tell that I've encountered my share of such clients.

Still, I maintain a policy: I only take clients for which we're the perfect match, and whom are the perfect match for us.

It's not easy, I'm quite young and often it's hard for a client to start trusting us. However I do know that I'm trying to do big things, and that building a good reputation will be crucial, and as Ogilvy said, taking such clients will hamper your reputation.

What I've done is setting a profile of clients who I think are a good match for us, and then go after them. In our case, business whose leaders are entrepreneurial types, and that I think can easily become success cases soon but need some help getting there. They usually become identified with me and working together comes as a consequence.

If thing's don't seem like they will work out for the best, I'll direct them to a competitor I respect. It's better to cultivate a good relationship than getting one quick sale I might even regret later.

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